Developmental Milestones

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As children grow, they are always learning new things. Below are some the things you should look for as your child grows. Use these milestones as a guide to identify behaviors and, if you have any concerns, talk to your physician or contact BCS.

6 Months

Respond to own name
Respond to other people's emotions and often seem happy
Begin sitting without support
Copy sounds and string vowels together
Like to play with others, especially parents

12 Months

Use simple gestures, like shading head "no" or waving "bye-bye"
Say "mama" and "dada" and exclamations like "uh-oh"
Copy others gestures
Respond to simple spoken requests

18 Months

Use several words
Walk on their own
Play simple pretend, such as feeding a doll
Understand what simple objects are for
Point to show others something interesting
Show a full range of emotions, such as happy, sad angry

2 Years

Use sentences with 2 to 4 words
Can follow simple instructions
Get excited when with other children
Can kick a ball
Point to things or pictures when they are named

3 Years

Copy adults and friends
Show affection for friends without prompting
Carry on a conversation using 2 or 3 sentences
Play make-believe with dolls, animals and people

4 Years

Tell stories
Can hop and stand on one foot
Would rather plat with other children than by themselves
Play cooperatively with others
Draws a person with 2 to 4 body parts

Not reaching these milestones, or reaching them much later than other children, could be a a sign of developmental delay. Acting early makes an incredible difference. You know your child best, but if you are concerned about your child's development, talk to the doctor and the following questions:

  • How can I track my child's development?
  • Is my child's development on track for his or her age?
  • What should I do if I'm worried about my child's progress?
  • Where can I more information?

If you or your doctor are still concerned, contact Behavior Care Specialists.